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Biking the Bay Bridge Interpretive Trail
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Biking the Bay Bridge Interpretive Trail

One lovely bonus of running a business dedicated to exploration, adventure and communication design, is that I always have an excuse to leave the house and explore. Last Friday, I did just that. I rode my bike over to the Oakland side of the Bay Bridge. What did I find? Excellent views of the sparkling bay and old bridge tear-down, and excellent interpretive signage about the East Bay Municipal Utilities District (EBMUD).

Bay-Bridge-Post-(12)The Bay Bridge Trail begins under a section of highway merges and exits known as “The Maze”, then continues alongside the bridge traffic. On the other side of the bike/pedestrian trail is a large set of facilities that sort of blend in with the factories and shipyards nearby. Yet with a quick glance at the first available interp sign and I quickly learned that this facility is actually making the Bay Area a healthier place by cleaning our wastewater! I also learned what I can do to keep our water cleaner and safer, and why it matters.

To get a closer look at any of the photos, just click on them.

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Three things I liked about this interp site:

  • These signs tell the story of wastewater in the bay area, a topic that is relevant to all residents.
  • Each sign has about the right about of introductory text and narrows its focus to three main points.
  • The signs are relevant to their location. You are learning about the facilities and processes taking place just over the fence.

 

Bonuses:

  • Pretty colors and decent illustrations
  • Consistent branding throughout
  • White powdercoat on the frame matches the new bridge

 

And one final thought:

One of the photos in the slideshow shows graffiti tags on the concrete pad and the leg of the wayside pedestal, but there is no graffiti on the panel itself. It would be so easy to make all this information temporarily unreadable, yet the vandals left the information untouched. Now, I’m not saying they deserve medals or anything. I just found it interesting.
DID YOU YOU KNOW? I’ve designed hundreds of waysides for trails, historic sites, and nature centers. If you’re looking for a wayside designer, check out my Wonderful Waysides package! But hurry, the price for this amazing package goes up November 15.

1 Comment on this Post.

  1. awesome, Stefanie!!

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